NaPoWriMo #27 – Long Lines

Welcome to Writing Prompt Pit Stop! It’s Day 27 of NaPoWriMo and only three more days left in the month. Wow, it’s flying by! Today’s prompt was to write long lines...a la Walt Whitman, or perhaps making a haiku (17 syllables) out of each line; however, as I’ve done with a few other prompts this month…I’ve given myself creative license. So my poem, “A Writer’s Observation,” is practically all one long line…perhaps close to a run-on, yet it’s a very brief poem…but definitely longer than a haiku. Anyway, I had fun because it really is this writer’s observation. Following is my poem, the prompt used, and then the April PAD Challenge prompt. Enjoy!

 

A Writer’s Observation

Hemingway wrote of watching the goat herd travel the morning streets of Paris on his way to a café to write; words for other mammal masses that don’t appreciate the life of a writer any more than those goats in the morning streets appreciate the Eiffel Tower, a good bottle of cabernet sauvignon, or aged brie.

Day 27 NaPoWriMo prompt:

Today’s prompt comes to us from Megan Pattie, who points us to the work of the Irish poet Ciaran Carson, who increasingly writes using very long lines. Carson has stated that his lines are (partly) based on the seventeen syllables of the haiku, and that he strives to achieve the clarity of the haiku in each line. So today, Megan and I collectively challenge you to write a poem with very long lines. You can aim for seventeen syllables, but that’s just a rough guide. If you’re having trouble buying into the concept of long lines, maybe this essay on Whitman’s infamously leggy verse will convince you of their merits.

Day 27 April PAD Challenge prompt:

Happy Administrative Assistant Day! If you’re an administrative assistant, perhaps you’ll get a chuckle out of today’s prompt. If not, I hope you still get something out of it too.

For today’s prompt, write a take off poem. Take off work for you admin assistants out there (and any other workers). Take off a runway–for those of you who like to fly. Take off from a dangerous or weird situation–or maybe even a comfortable one. Or maybe you have a completely different take off of a “take off” poem. Go on and take off on your poetic paths.

If you get something that you would like to share, go ahead and post in comments below!

Keep writing!

Lylanne

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